86 Radio Stations Shut since Taliban Takeover in Afghanistan

As the United Nations commemorated World Radio Day on February 13, Afghanistan is in mourning, as 86 radio stations have shut down in the six months since the Taliban assumed control of the country.

Media watchdog organizations indicated that financial and political difficulties are the primary causes of the Afghan media’s demise, according to Tolo News. The recent political transition in Afghanistan with the fall of the republican government has had a significant impact on the radio sector of the Afghan media.

According to Tolo News, Radio Jahan is one of dozens of radio stations that have stopped broadcasting since August.

“Radio Jahan has been off the air for more than six months due to significant financial difficulties,” claimed Mosawar Rasikh, the station’s director.

“Around 70% of radio stations in the country have closed. In the current circumstances, the factors include economic issues and broadcasting programs. The government, on the other hand, is adamant about collecting taxes from radio stations “Shafiullah Azizi, the head of the Zamzama radio stations, declared as much.

Tolo News reports, over 300 different types of media organizations have been shut down since the Taliban surged to power in August.

“Our findings reveal that unless the international community provides financial support to the media, many of these radio stations would close over the next six months, indicating a media collapse in the country,” said Hojatullah Mujadidi, president of the Afghan Independent Journalist Association.

Despite the fact that radio has advanced technologically in a variety of ways, it remains one of the primary sources of information for people in various countries, according to Tolo News.

“We have a lot of radio-related memories. There was a period when listening to the radio was strictly prohibited. When we were listening to the radio, we assigned one person to keep an eye on things; we were listening to it in secret, after all “Mangal, a Wardak resident, expressed his thoughts.

“It had been a long time. I was a toddler at the time. Our village has received a radio equipment. I had the impression that there were persons within the radio device while listening to the transmission “Wardak resident Abdul Salim expressed his thoughts.

In 1926, during the reign of former Afghan King Amanullah Khan, Afghanistan’s first radio station was established. Radio Kabul was the first radio station to broadcast in Kabul.

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