The impact of Lionel Messi’s Departure from Barcelona

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With the farewells said and done, Lionel Messi appears to be departing Barcelona for good. No, this isn’t some brilliant strategizing to persuade La Liga to modify its salary restrictions. The Argentine superstar is no longer with us. PSG is rumored to be interested in signing him, and we’re inclined to believe them.

If you’re reading this, you’re most likely a Bayern Munich supporter, and your biggest concern is how this move would affect the Champions League. Don’t worry, I’ve outlined the ramifications below. Just be aware that they aren’t attractive. Traditional European elites are finally being pushed aside by new investor groups.

Investment-driven clubs have used the pandemic as a playground. That’s a great way of referring to teams like Manchester City, PSG, and Chelsea, who, thanks to their affluent owners, don’t have to worry about money. I’d use a different term, but I know some City fans read this blog and I don’t want to offend them.

Barcelona is collapsing. They have very little chance. Juventus is a club that has been terribly run. Real Madrid and Bayern Munich are both cutting back on their spending. Inter Milan’s owners are going to liquidate the club. These are historic clubs that are all striving to make ends meet.

In the meantime, the big three continue to spend. Messi’s most likely destination at the end of this odyssey is PSG, but both Man City and Chelsea would be excellent options for the Argentinian. There isn’t a single member of the traditional European elite who wants to be the world’s best player — it’s simply a matter of whatever plastic institution has the most cash. In the last two seasons, all three of these teams have reached the Champions League finals, with Bayern being the lone exception. That pattern is likely to persist.

Lionel Messi and Cristiano Ronaldo have left the Spanish league, ushering in a new era. The majority of clubs are in debt or have financial difficulties. A private equity firm is looking to purchase 10% of the league’s television rights for the next 50 years. And that’s meant to be the answer to their predicament.

At the moment, La Liga appears to be entering a gloomy era. Only Real Madrid and Atletico Madrid appear to be surviving the virus, but they are both walking wounded. The less said about Barcelona, the better. El Clasico, the league’s most popular event, has seen its worth plummet. The traditional rivalry has lost its allure.

For almost a decade, the Spanish league has ruled Europe. In the last ten years, Spanish teams have dominated both the Europa League and the Champions League, with the English Premier League a distant second. Bayern Munich is the only representative of the German League, and there are no other top leagues to be found.

Messi and Ronaldo are no longer among us. The majority of clubs are in debt or have financial difficulties. A private equity firm is looking to purchase 10% of the league’s television rights for the next 50 years. And that’s meant to be the answer to their predicament.

At the moment, La Liga appears to be entering a gloomy era. Only Real Madrid and Atletico Madrid appear to be surviving the virus, but they are both walking wounded. The less said about Barcelona, the better. El Clasico, the league’s most popular event, has seen its worth plummet. The traditional rivalry has lost its allure.

For almost a decade, the Spanish league has ruled Europe. In the last ten years, Spanish teams have dominated both the Europa League and the Champions League, with the English Premier League a distant second. Bayern Munich is the only representative of the German League, and there are no other top leagues to be found.


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